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Mother's Day for feminists

Six things to read this

Chelsea Slender

It’s 2016. Michael Pollan’s four part Netflix documentary Cooked has graced our screens and all discussion of the award winning writer’s work centres around nutrition, nature and the famous mantra: “eat food, not too much, mostly plants”.

Fast forward to 2019 and the conversation has certainly changed. Pollan’s latest book is called How to Change Your Mind and now, along with sustainable eating and the importance of fresh food consumption, Pollan has us talking about tripping, meditation and the power psychedelics have to revolutionise the mental health industry.

From experimenting with micro-dosing, to immersing himself in both above and below ground psychedelic culture, Pollan brings his storytelling prowess and approachable take on science to a whole new facet of the human experience. 

She coined the term ‘hip hop feminism’  

While the music industry continues to reckon with its own #MeToo moment, Morgan coined the term “hip-hop feminism” as early as 1999 with the publication of her book, When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost. Giving voice to the most intimate thoughts of the post-Civil Rights, post-soul generation, Morgan offered a provocative and powerful look into representations of the modern black woman: a complex world in which feminists often had not-so-clandestine affairs with the most sexist of men; where women who treasured their independence frequently preferred men who picked up the tab. She called for a more capacious form of feminism: “We need a voice like our music – one that samples and layers many voices, injects its sensibilities into the old and flips it into something new, provocative, and powerful”.

She coined the term ‘hip hop feminism’  

While the music industry continues to reckon with its own #MeToo moment, Morgan coined the term “hip-hop feminism” as early as 1999 with the publication of her book, When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost. Giving voice to the most intimate thoughts of the post-Civil Rights, post-soul generation, Morgan offered a provocative and powerful look into representations of the modern black woman: a complex world in which feminists often had not-so-clandestine affairs with the most sexist of men; where women who treasured their independence frequently preferred men who picked up the tab. She called for a more capacious form of feminism: “We need a voice like our music – one that samples and layers many voices, injects its sensibilities into the old and flips it into something new, provocative, and powerful”.

She coined the term ‘hip hop feminism’  

While the music industry continues to reckon with its own #MeToo moment, Morgan coined the term “hip-hop feminism” as early as 1999 with the publication of her book, When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost. Giving voice to the most intimate thoughts of the post-Civil Rights, post-soul generation, Morgan offered a provocative and powerful look into representations of the modern black woman: a complex world in which feminists often had not-so-clandestine affairs with the most sexist of men; where women who treasured their independence frequently preferred men who picked up the tab. She called for a more capacious form of feminism: “We need a voice like our music – one that samples and layers many voices, injects its sensibilities into the old and flips it into something new, provocative, and powerful”.

She coined the term ‘hip hop feminism’  

While the music industry continues to reckon with its own #MeToo moment, Morgan coined the term “hip-hop feminism” as early as 1999 with the publication of her book, When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost. Giving voice to the most intimate thoughts of the post-Civil Rights, post-soul generation, Morgan offered a provocative and powerful look into representations of the modern black woman: a complex world in which feminists often had not-so-clandestine affairs with the most sexist of men; where women who treasured their independence frequently preferred men who picked up the tab. She called for a more capacious form of feminism: “We need a voice like our music – one that samples and layers many voices, injects its sensibilities into the old and flips it into something new, provocative, and powerful”.

She coined the term ‘hip hop feminism’  

While the music industry continues to reckon with its own #MeToo moment, Morgan coined the term “hip-hop feminism” as early as 1999 with the publication of her book, When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost. Giving voice to the most intimate thoughts of the post-Civil Rights, post-soul generation, Morgan offered a provocative and powerful look into representations of the modern black woman: a complex world in which feminists often had not-so-clandestine affairs with the most sexist of men; where women who treasured their independence frequently preferred men who picked up the tab. She called for a more capacious form of feminism: “We need a voice like our music – one that samples and layers many voices, injects its sensibilities into the old and flips it into something new, provocative, and powerful”.

She coined the term ‘hip hop feminism’  

While the music industry continues to reckon with its own #MeToo moment, Morgan coined the term “hip-hop feminism” as early as 1999 with the publication of her book, When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost. Giving voice to the most intimate thoughts of the post-Civil Rights, post-soul generation, Morgan offered a provocative and powerful look into representations of the modern black woman: a complex world in which feminists often had not-so-clandestine affairs with the most sexist of men; where women who treasured their independence frequently preferred men who picked up the tab. She called for a more capacious form of feminism: “We need a voice like our music – one that samples and layers many voices, injects its sensibilities into the old and flips it into something new, provocative, and powerful”.

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