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How to make:
A soft cave

Utzon's Universe

Malene Abildgaard & Julie Dufour

Introduction

Before you start, we recommend that you try our first Utzon's Universe excercises: making a figure of yourself, and building a house in a tree.

In this exercise you are going to build a model of a cave without right angles - maybe inspired by Jørn Utzon's proposal for the Jorn Museum in Silkeborg. The cave can be for you or for someone you know. Your building material is a common everyday material, tape, because it is suitable for building soft, curved surfaces. 


Materials:
Masking tape
Card or foam board, size A5
Sketch book, optional 

Tools:
Pencil
Scissors
Scale figure, 1:50 or 1:100

What to do

1. Start by testing the tape, which is your building material. What can you do with it? Try out different forms: rings in different widths and heights, big soft curve, tall columns, and long tubes. Use different technique, like rolling, folding, or doubling up.

2. If you are working with big soft forms, you might need to stabilise the wall or the roof. You can do this by doubling up the tape, sticky side against sticky side.

3. Make small quick sketches for your cave model proposal and think about how you want it to be:

• How do you enter it?

• How big do you want it to be?

• How bright do you want it to be?

You can either make small sketch models of tape or you can draw your ideas in your sketch book. Remember that your cave must be without right angles!

4. When you have worked your way to a desirable form, build your model on a foundation of card or foam board. Choose whether you want it to be at scale 1:50 or 1:100. Use your scale figure from time to time so that you can keep an eye on scale proportions. 

You may also like...

Utzon's Universe: A Figure of Yourself

Create a mini version of you using Jørn Utzon's own design approach

Utzon's Universe: A house in a tree

Learn how to build the perfect house, just like ours.

How Mexico, Iran and China shaped Utzon's Opera House

The Horisont exhibition dives into architect Jørn Utzon's travel diaries.